About Wattan Wali Pagg

Wattan Wali Turban Is Free Handed Turban Style

Turban “The Pride of Sikhs”

A Dastar or Pagri is a mandatory headgear for Sikhs. Dastar is closely associated with Sikhism and is an important part of the Sikh culture. Wearing a Sikh turban is mandatory for all Amritdhari (baptized) Sikhs (also known as Khalsa). Among the Sikhs, the turban is an article of faith that represents honour, self-respect, courage, spirituality, and piety.
The Khalsa Sikhs, who adorn the Five Ks, wear the turban partly to cover their long, uncut hair (kesh). The turban is mostly identified with the Sikh males, although some Sikh women also wear turban. The Khalsa Sikhs regard the turban as an important part of the unique Sikh identity. They are easily recognizable by their distinctive turbans. Some Sahajdhari Sikhs do not wear turbans.
HISTORY OF TURBAN
The Turban has been an important part of the Sikh culture since the time of the Sixth Guru. At Guru Ram Das Jyoti jyot, his elder son Pirthi Chand wore a special turban, which is usually worn by an elder son when his father passes away. At that time Guru Arjan Dev was honoured with the turban of Guruship: Marne di pag Pirthiye badhi. Guriyaee pag Arjan Ladhi Guru Angad Dev honoured Guru Amar Das ji with a Siropa (turban) when he was made the Guru. Guru Gobind Singh, the last human Sikh Guru, wrote: Kangha dono vaqt kar, paag chune kar bandhai. (“Comb your hair twice a day and tie your turban carefully, turn by turn.”) Bhai Rattan Singh Bhangu, one of the earliest Sikh historians, wrote in Sri Gur Panth Parkash: Doi vele utth bandhyo dastare, pahar aatth rakhyo shastar sambhare Kesan ki kijo pritpal, nah(i) ustran se katyo vaal Tie your turban twice a day and wear shaster (weapons to protect dharma), and keep them with care, 24 hours a day. Take good care of your hair.

STYLES OF TURBANS

1. Men’s Double Patti (Nok)
This is a very common Sikh turban style. It is very common in Punjab, India. The Nok is a double wide turban. 6 meters of turban cloth are cut in half, then into two 3 metre pieces. They are then sewn together to make it Double wide, thus creating a “Double Patti,” or a Nok turban. This turban is larger than most Sikh dastars, but contains fewer wraps around the head.

2. Chand Tora Dhamala
This style of turban is generally worn by Nihang Sikhs . This is a warrior style turban meant for going into battle. The “Chand Tora” is a metal symbol consisting of a crescent and a double edged sword, it is held in place at the front of the turban by woven chainmail cord tied in a pattern within the turban to protect the head from slashing weapons.

3. Amritsar Dhamala
This is the most common Dhamala turban. It consists of one 5 meter piece (Pavo Blue) one 11 meter piece any color, commonly sabz (white) and pavo blue. Both pieces are 35 cm wide, and referred to in Amritsar as Dhamala Material.

 

4. Basic Dhamala
This style of turban is generally worn by Nihang Sikhs . This is a warrior style turban meant for going into battle. The “Chand Tora” is a metal symbol consisting of a crescent and a double edged sword, it is held in place at the front of the turban by woven chainmail cord tied in a pattern within the turban to protect the head from slashing weapons.

5. General Sikh Turban
Another common Sikh turban style for men. Unlike the “double patti” turban, the turban is longer and goes 7 times around the head. If you use the “Notai” technique and have a big joora (hair knot), do not make it right in front at your forehead. You will end up tying the turban on the joora, and it will make your turban look very high and big.
6. Patka/Keski Turban
This is a common sikh turban among young boys. It is normally used as more of a casual Pugree, or sometimes for sports. Commonly, this is a peela (shade of yellow) coloured turban